The Vinton School

Vinton School (William Byrd first High School) (2014_02_18 18_15_37 UTC)

Photo provided by Angie Bell Chewning

In the story I posted for Memorial Day, “Isabel” (my grandmother) attended The Vinton School while living with relatives. She loved that school and since she spoke of it so often when I was a child, I couldn’t wait until I was old enough to attend the same school. By then, the 4 classroom building sat at the bottom of the hill where the High School, William Byrd stood. Of course, it was just the little building when Granny was a student. I understand there was a common room in the middle of the building which was used as an auditorium, gym and cafeteria. The four classrooms opened into the larger, common room.

My grandparents lived close enough William Byrd that we could hear band practice. It was great! My cousin, Debbie taught me a couple of cheers and we would hop around to the beat of the drums.

My stepfather’s younger sister was a student at “the high school” and I loved looking at her yearbooks; dreaming of the day I would also be a “Terrier.” That day finally came the fall of 1970. Since the building on the hill was built in the early 1930’s, the steps were worn with age. Framed pictures of graduating classes lined the halls. (I was late for class once because I was looking for a familiar face on the wall.)

New William Byrd High School on the hill

Photo provided by Angie Bell Chewning

I was delighted to discover that my math class and I think an art class were located in the school my Grandmother had attended. The little building at the bottom of the hill which was once known as, “The Vinton School.” That “hill” was very steep. Not only did we get a lot of exercise getting to Math class but once or twice when it was snowing, I discovered sliding, rolling or tumbling down that hill was not fun. And now, that is part of my history too. My favorite teacher at William Byrd Intermediate (Middle School) was Tina Cook. She was a believer who wanted to serve the Lord too. She was an organist at her church and to my delight, a counselor at the same Bible Camp my friends from Church and I attended.

My class was in this location for one year only. There were so many sixth-graders moving up to William Byrd Intermediate (on the hill) there wasn’t enough room for us. So we got to go to the new, modern Wm. Byrd High School in the eighth grade. It was exciting, but I missed the history in the old building.

Imagine all of the stories within the walls of these old buildings! My grandmother was there only a short time but I’m so glad she told me about it! Just remember, when you tell your children and grandchildren stories about the “good old days” they are probably listening even when you think they aren’t.



The Watch (Part 3) Preview chapter for Hope Beyond The Sunset By Katherine Hinchee Purdy

Memorial Day is about the ones who gave the ultimate sacrifice – the ones who died in battle.  Earl Hamner portrayed this side of Memorial Day when he wrote about “Ben” who made a Memorial Day bench to honor the uncle for whom he was named. When Grandpa Walton sat on the bench and gently touched his sons name, his face said it all. 

We often forget about the suffering of the ones left behind. In todays society, the sorrow and rememberance  of Memorial Day has become a day for picnics and swimming.

The story below is from a chapter from the novel I am currently working on. Hope Beyond the Sunset which is a sequel to The Vision of a Mother’s Heart. The setting is 1926 in Vinton, Virginia where twelve-year-old Isabel attended school. Miss Merrideth is her teacher who overheard boys in the classroom boasting that they would have “Cleaned the Kiser’s clock.” They learned something very important that day.

The Watch
Preview chapter from Hope Beyond The Sunset by Kathreine Hinchee Purdy
(Isabel’s Story Book 2)

Alright class, that will be enough talk about things of which you know nothing.” Miss Meredith closed the classroom door and moved slowly, deliberately to her desk, pulling out her history book and an envelope before addressing the class.

“Now, open your history book to the chapter on The Great War. How many of you completed your assignment to interview a veteran of the Great War?”

Isabel raised her hand, slightly leaning to the right, hoping the boy sitting directly in front of her hid her. I hope she doesn’t call on me!

“Fine,” Miss Meredith said as she turned to write on the chalk board. “Your assignment tonight is to interview the wife, mother, sister or child of a Great War Veteran. I would like you to copy the questions from the board to include in your interview.”

Murmurs and groans filled the room. “Don’t know why we have to ask the women,” a boy from the back of the room stated boldly, “they didn’t do nothing!”

“They didn’t do anything, Timothy,” Miss Meredith corrected, “and your statement is false. Women made the sacrifice of their loved ones as well as doing all that they could to aid our troops. Many women took over running the farm or the family business, some went to work in factories to provide for their family, they knitted socks and scarves, rolled bandages, provided doughnuts and coffee for troops on the home front and many young women joined the Red Cross to give comfort and provide nursing skills to our wounded soldiers.”

“Yes, ma’am,” Timothy said and slouched in his chair.

“Sit up straight and listen to the story I am about to share with you.” Miss Meredith lifted up the watch necklace, ran her finger gently over the raised design, and allowed it to fall gently against her high collar shirtwaist.

Isabel looked at Millie across the aisle and both girls leaned forward, sensing a good story was forthcoming.

“Many years ago, two children sat at the very desks you are using today. The young ladies sat on one side of the room and the boys sat on the other. Both children loved school and looked forward to a bright future. As they matured, their friendship grew into a deep love for one another and the young man promised to marry the young lady after he graduated from the University of Virginia. Both sets of parents approved of the couple’s plans. While the young man studied at the University, the young lady also attended college while filling her hope chest with handmade linens and other items which would someday grace the home they had planned together.

Their plans came to a sudden halt one fateful day.” The teacher paused and looked around the room slowly before continuing the story. “One terrible three letter word shattered their dreams forever. War.”

“The young lady has given me permission to share this story and a letter written by her young man with you, today. I want you to listen carefully; you may be in the same situation someday. I pray that will not be the case,” she said as she took her seat at her desk, removed a slightly yellowed paper from its envelope and took a deep breath and began to read.


My darling,

Sun is beginning to set and the smoke from a recent battle still hangs in the air. There is no way of knowing when the sound of war will reconvene so I am taking this respite to write to you as I wait in a deep, damp trench. I hope you have received my letters. I have only received one from you but I know there are more as you promised to write me every day. I know you keep your promises; you always have. Even when we were children, you hid food in your pockets and climbed the old oak tree outside my room on the nights I had been in trouble for throwing spit balls at the teacher or fighting on the playground. The punishment was always to go to bed without supper and that always broke your tender heart. You always promised to bring me something to eat and you always did. Oh, if only you could bring some of your Mama’s delicious fried chicken and biscuits tonight. A piece of your cherry pie would be like a slice of heaven now. Just thinking of the delicious fragrances takes my mind off the horrors surrounding me.

Do you remember our pal Moose? He lost a leg this morning. Pray that gangrene will not set in and take his life. He was only a few paces ahead of me. I attempted to carry him to safety but was suddenly caught up in a barrage of gunfire. Just as the medics arrived, we took flack so thick I thought it would never end. I returned to fighting and my rifle was so hot it seared the skin. I won’t go into details about the battle. I know you are praying, and that we are not alone. The Lord is with us. So I will speak of more pleasant things, my dear.

Do you remember the little cottage over by the lake I showed you the summer before last? The one we dreamed of owning some day? I know you do. You had it decorated in your pretty little head before I had time to walk around the perimeters.  The next day, you showed me sketches of the changes you wanted to make to “our” cottage. I can still see that final drawing in my head.  The cottage painted blue with white trim, window boxes filled with flowers, white gingerbread trim, a red door and ivy growing up the side. A cobblestone walkway lined with flowers, fronted by a white picket fence with a swinging gate. We shall have that as our home, dear when I return. Arrangements were made with my parents and their lawyer to apply a large percentage of my soldier’s pay to go towards the cottage and for the renovations.  We will even be able to add two rooms downstairs and up and plumbing installed. Should anything happen to me, the cottage is yours.  I can see you now, standing in the large bay window, checking the time on your watch necklace, counting the minutes until I arrive home from work. Perhaps tapping your foot, as I drive up in our motor car twenty minutes late for dinner. Can’t you just see it? This is what keeps me sane as we march along, looking for jerry’s, doing the task at hand. Waiting, watching, fearing, praying and dreaming the day when this awful war is over and we can go home.

It is getting dark and I will try and muster up some imaginative food as I try to force down the horrible concoction they refer to as rations. I will think of Mother’s pot roast tonight, I think. If you have a chance, when you receive this letter, will you please make a batch of your famous fudge and take it to Mother and Father? Visit with them for a while and please, have two pieces of that sweet delicacy for me; accompanied by two mugs of that good coffee from the store down the street?

I know I don’t have to ask. The letter I received from Mother said that you visit often and are always wearing our promise watch – the watch you promised to wear always until we meet again. I can still remember when I gave it to you. It was the night before I shipped out. You didn’t say so but I know you were expecting a ring. You covered your surprise well, my dear, but I knew you were disappointed. I couldn’t place a ring of promise on your finger under sad circumstances. I will save that joy until I come home. We can get married and live in our little cottage together for the rest of our lives. Just think of it, growing old together in our dream cottage.

Your words still ring in my ears as I remember you gently tracing the designing of the silver watch. “I will wear this near my heart and every tick of the watch will remind me of your heartbeat. Then you will not seem so far away. You will be just as near as my heart!”

I still have the locket you gave me with your image smiling at me inside and my parents on the other side. It too lies near my heart, carefully protected by my uniform and a small Bible I keep in my left pocket.

Something is happening ahead. I must put this away for now. Remember, I am only a heartbeat away. There is something else God is prompting me to remind you.

“To be absent from the body is to be present with the Lord.”

We shall meet again; here on earth or in our cottage in Heaven.

Forever yours,

Isabel dabbed her eyes with the corner of her hankie as Miss Meredith gently folded the letter and placed it carefully into the envelope.

“This letter was delivered with a box of his belongings a month later. He didn’t even get to sign his name. A German bullet pierced his heart – I am told that he never felt pain. He was immediately transported from the trenches of war to the splendor of Heaven.”

The class sat in stunned silence as the school bell alerted them that the school day was at an end. No one moved for minutes and then as the spell was broken by a girl’s gentle sob. Students quietly gathered their books and walked past Miss Meredith with lowered heads.

The Watch (Part 4) Preview Chapter for Hope Beyond The Sunset By Katherine Hinchee Purdy

The Watch
Preview chapter from Hope Beyond The Sunset
By Kathreine Hinchee Purdy
(Isabel’s Story Book 2)



Isabel waited until every student had left and softly walked to the teacher who sat at the desk, fingering the watch around her neck with a far-away look on her face.

“Miss Meredith,” Isabel said softly as she touched the teacher’s arm. “I’m sorry about your friend. He sounds wonderful.”

“He was,” Miss Meredith reached for a hankie tucked into her sleeve and dabbed her eyes. “How did you know?”

“Your watch – you don’t just wear it to tell time. You trace the design with your fingers when you think no one is watching. I do the same thing with Mama’s hankie.” Isabel pulled an embroidered handkerchief from her handbag. “When Mama died, I kept this because it smelled like her. It’s one of the few things we saved when the house caught on fire a few weeks after Mama died. Sometimes I hold it to my face and remember Mama.”

The teacher nodded and touched Isabel’s arm. “Your Mama would have been very proud of you.”

“I hope so,” Isabel said softly. “Sometimes I wonder if she would be sad that Papa gave us away.”

“It must have been very difficult for your Papa to find homes for all nine of you. I understand it is only temporary,” Miss Meredith said gently. “He was brave to make the wise decision to put your future before the comfort of having all of you under one roof.”

“If Papa could have gotten married, we could have stayed together. I hope he finds someone soon,” Isabel said as she picked up her school books and turned toward the door. Just as she reached the doorway, she turned to face her teacher again.”

“Miss Meredith,”

“Yes, Isabel?”

“Do you think you will ever get married?”


The Watch Part 2 (A Preview) by Katherine Hinchee Purdy

Isabel finished her lunch and replaced the napkin in her lunch tin, shaking away crumbs from her dress and lined up with the rest of the class behind Miss. Meredith

“Alright class,” Miss Meredith said as she looked at the watch she wore on a silver chain around her neck. “You may quietly get a drink of water at the water fountain and walk softly to your seat. Take out your history book alone with your assignment,” she added.

“I don’t like studying about war,” Isabel whispered to the girl behind her in line.

“Me either,” Millie said, pulling her long hair to the side as she anticipated her turn at the fountain. “War is boys stuff!”

“I like it,” a male voice chirped in. “We cleaned the Kiser’s clock for good!”

“Yeah,” another boy joined the conversation. “Wish we had been there!”

“That will be enough, children! You know you are not allowed to talk in the hallway,” Miss Meredith said as she arched her eyebrows. “Hurry up now, we are wasting time!”

Isabel quickly sipped tepid water from the fountain, walked into the class, and took her seat. “I hope Miss Meredith likes my report,” she said as she pulled out her history book from the desk and smoothed out the single sheet of paper pressed between the pages, marking the chapter.

“My brother, Jim didn’t have much to say about the war. Not even a page worth!”

“Daddy didn’t say much either, except France must be beautiful with they’re not at war,” Millie said and wrinkled her nose at the boys across the room who boasted of the ways they would have “stick it to the Kiser.”

The Watch – Preview Chapter for Sequel to The Vision of a Mother’s Heart

Inspiration for Chapter from Hope Beyond The Sunset by Katherine Hinchee Purdy

This watch inspired a chapter in Hope Beyond The Sunset by      Katherine H. Purdy

I love antiques. They remind me of a day gone by and of the people who once used the items daily. This watch belonged to one of John’s distant relatives. She was a wonderful spinster school teacher for most of her life. She wore this watch around her neck and no doubt, it kept perfect timing for her.

Watch for a preview chapter from Hope Beyond The Sunset by Katherine Hinchee Purdy. This is Book Two of Isabel’s Story. The sequel to The Vision of a Mother’s Heart.

When the time is right, you will hear the story of another watch much like this one…

Until then,