Tag Archive | History

Isabel’s First Day at School

d2ee3aa270ee17e8bb5ec91e9dff5600

Isabel was nervous about going back to school. She fretted all summer, remembering that last year when she walked into the classroom, some of the girls snickered at her new dress that Mama had made especially for this occasion. She overheard Arlene Mason whisper to the other girls, “Isabel’s dress is made from the same fabric as Mother’s kitchen curtains. Wouldn’t that make her a Window?”

Pencil Box

 

Isabel took a deep breath and smoothed the invisible wrinkles

in her new dress before entering the classroom. She felt several

pairs of critical eyes surveying her and wished she had not let

Mama french braid her hair after all. “My hair is all wrong. I

really look like a farm girl,” she whispered to Eugene, who pushed

her through the threshold and into the room.

“Good morning, Isabel. Don’t you look nice this morning,”

Sally Anne said. She waved at Isabel to sit in the desk next to her.


Isabel felt grateful
 for the compliment and sat   

with uncertainty as Arlene Mason gave her a look that could have

frozen an erupting volcano. The cold stare played havoc with

Isabel’s nerves, and she seemed to drop everything she touched.

Isabel sat down beside Sally Anne and carefully laid her slate,

her lunch pail and her pencil box on the desk.

 

Her new carved pencil box opened and dumped pencils all over

the floor while Miss Catron was talking. When the textbooks were

passed out, the history book, which seemed to have a mind of its

own , jumped out of her arms and landed on the floor with a loud

thud, making everyone in the room jump and then giggle.

 

That is, everyone except Isabel, who merely wished for the floor to open

up and swallow her so she could sprint home, where she did not

have to worry about what other people thought. Isabel reached

down to pick up her book, but someone else had beaten her to it.

Ernie Mason picked up the history book, wiped it off, and

smiled before returning the book to Isabel. She was not sure,

but it almost looked like he winked at her…almost, or was just

it just her imagination?

 

“Isabel, Ernie Mason just winked at you,” Sally Anne

whispered from across the aisle. “I thought he liked you last

year, and now I know it.”

“Who, me?” Isabel said. “Nobody likes me.”

“Oh, yes they do, Isabel,” Sally Anne said. She watched the

teacher, who was gathering information from a new student.

“Everybody likes you; only you just don’t know it.”

 

Isabel turned her attention to the teacher, but her thoughts

kept returning to Sally Anne’s remark. Could it be true? Had

she misjudged her classmates because one or two were unkind?

She determined to talk it over with Mama later.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Isabel pulled her lunch pail out of her desk at lunchtime and

ran to greet the rest of her siblings under the oak tree for lunch.

As she sat down on the ground, she saw Sally Anne eating and

laughing with Arlene Mason and two of the most stuck up girls

in school. “Rich girls stick together,” she said as storm clouds

passed by overhead.

 

How about you? Have you been nervous about your first day of school? Even in 1924, children faced bullies and cliques in school. They are everywhere but things are not always as they seem. Later in The Vision of a Mother’s Heart, Isabel learns that some of the children she had dreaded to face when school started had problems she couldn’t have imagined. Perhaps some children act superior to other children because they feel inferior and act that way to feel better about themselves. With help from her Mother, Isabel learned to be kind and forgiving. She would never have to worry about bullies again because she knew the secret. They’re afraid too.

“And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.”

Ephesians 4:32

The Vision of a Mother’s Heart is available!

The Vision of a Mother’s Heart~ Home

the vision of a mother's heart by katherine hinchee purdy (2) (663x1024) (2013_12_29 18_40_53 utc)

 

the vision of a mother's heart back of book

 

“Train up a child in the way he should go; and when he is old, he will not depart from it.”

Proverbs 22:6

Mama Greene’s had a vision or hope for her nine children as she prayed for each child nightly.

  • For each of her children to receive Jesus Christ as their Savior at an early age.
  • That they would live according to His Word every day of their lives.
  • That they would receive an education. Her hope was that all of her children would at least graduate from 8th Grade. In the 1920s this was considered educated among the farming communities. If they wanted to send their children to high school, they had to pay tuition which was difficult for poor families. They needed the older children to help on the farm.
  • That they would honor “Papa.”
  • That they would remain together and be close as a family.

The Vision of a Mother’s Heart is back in print and is available!

(The e-book needs to be reformatted. If you read the ebook, please forgive the mistakes!)

Please click the link below for a preview.

http://The Vision of a Mother’s Heart (Isabel’s Story) (Volume 1) by Katherine Hinch… http://www.amazon.com/dp/1515298477/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_dsSXvb0G86QK0 via @amazon

Kathie Kingery Photography
PhotographerThe model for “Mama” is the real Isabel’s granddaughter, Emily.

Apron by K. Kingrey

~*~

The title of my first novel was borrowed from a song by singer and songwriter, Abigail Miller. The chorus contained the words:

Chorus:

The vision of a mother’s heart,

Is to share with her children the love only Jesus can give.

The Vision of a mother’s heart,

Is to see them all walking with God every day that they live.

 

This chorus summed up all that I wanted to depict in the story inspired by my grandmother’s childhood.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I didn’t have pictures of Jimmy and Avil (Billy) when they were small.

 

I am currently working on the sequel, Hope Beyond the Sunset. You may read sample chapters as listed in the archives.

As a child, I loved sitting under the table and listening to Granny, (Isabel) reminisce about her childhood while holding the picture of her mother in my hands and could almost see the story come to life.  I remember thinking, “This should be a book!” Little did I know that the Lord would use me to write their story.

I changed the last name of the family and other distant family members. They were real people who lived in Virginia. The first book takes place begins in 1924. Book two picks up where we left off in 1926 and will run through 1929.

One great thing about writing fiction even when inspired by a true story – we can change the ending. I will update you when Hope Beyond the Sunset is available.

The Vision of a Mother’s Heart is available on Amazon.com or you can buy a signed copy from me. I hope you will enjoy stepping into the past with Isabel and the “Greene” family!

The Child Workers of Roanoke Cotton Mills 1911

Katherine H. Purdy

These children are examples of workers who deserved Labor Day.

Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might;”

Ecclesiastes 9:10

 

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Faces of workers in need of help. This is who I think of on Labor Day.

When I see the pictures of young children who worked 12 hours a day, six days a week at the Roanoke Cotton Mills in Roanoke, Virginia it makes me sad for their lost childhood. On our Facebook History group, had quite a debate.

Take a good look at the faces of these precious, brave children.  See how young they were. Notice the barefoot boys? Shoes hindered their job of climbing on the machines so they had to work without shoes. I cringe to think of the dangers involved.  But they worked because they had to.

They didn’t take their pay to the local candy store, the soda fountain or to the ice cream parlor. No, they didn’t take their money to the Rialto Theatre on Saturday afternoon. They were working. They worked 12 hours a day, six days a week for low wages in order to help feed their family and to keep a roof over their head.

Parents who were in debt and couldn’t pay were sent to the Poor House along with their entire family. This is why some of the children were working. Others worked because their parents were sick, dead or failed to make enough to sustain the family so the children (as young as five years old) were sent to work. The money was turned over to their parents. Everyone in the family worked in order to keep the family together.

When I first started writing The Vision of a Mother’s Heart, I thought to break up a home was tragic and it is. However, to see children working hard in dangerous jobs at such a young age is more so. The picture with two boys standing together, the older with his arm protectively around his younger buddy makes me want to cry. Their eyes and facial expression seem “old”.   They remind me of my grandmother’s two older brothers.

Eugene & Curtis Minnix jpg (2014_02_18 18_15_37 UTC)

Eugene (the older boy) and James “Calvin” Minnix could have ended up in the same situation if their “Papa” hadn’t found homes for the children when he realized he couldn’t take care of them. This was often referred to as “Farming out” children to family and friends to stay (often working on farms to earn their keep) until the family was able to reunite. A story, I have found was all too common in the early twentieth century.

In Roanoke, the Poor House was in existence until 1958. It is now part of the Virginia Western Community College. It is said that conditions improved in the 1920s and inmates of “The Alms House” helped farm the surrounding land so they had fresh vegetables, eggs, and other good food. Inmates included from infants to the elderly. They were reportedly treated well. However, it was a shame for families who had to live there.

Lite Grey Scroll2

Things were different at that time. For centuries, children were apprenticed; they learned a trade by living under the supervision and care of a skilled business owner. For several generations, the Minnix men in our family learned to be blacksmiths and coopers. (Barrel makers) They also worked on farms sometimes in deplorable situations. My great-grandfather broke the mold and decided to become a farmer instead. His skill as a blacksmith came in handy on the farm.

By the time they learned their trade, they were proud to put their name on their work. They were thrilled and proud if they could write their own name. When there was a crisis or war, these young men didn’t think twice before enlisting to fight for their country. They taught values to their children and expected their children to learn responsibility. Yes, it is difficult for us to imagine children in such a sad situation but they were precious children who grew up to be hard-working, frugal, responsible citizens.

I don’t know about you, but I am thankful for each of these children.

For more information about the history of Labor Day, click on the link below.

History of Labor Day

Writers: Facebook history groups are treasures for research. Much of my research was found in local history books and also postings from the History of the City of Roanoke group as well as several local history groups including school nostalgia groups. Most who post are happy to share their stories, pictures, and documents with others. My thanks to friends who shared their stories and pictures with us and gave permission for me to use their pictures.

Blessings,

Kathy

A Walk in a Lovely Town

 

November, 2012

We stepped inside this lovely country store and it was as if we were crossing a threshold into the past. From shelves containing books about local history, old fashioned cookware, toys and clothing. Add local music and food and this gal didn’t want to leave. I could have stayed several hours as I perused aisles for future purchases; convinced that my husband will bring me back again soon. We had lunch while listening to local musicians and bought a book with a pictorial history of the area.

Where is this lovely spot located? Along the curvy roads of South western Virginia. Floyd, to be precise.  My first impression as we pulled into the parking lot which faced the country store, I remarked that we must be in Mayberry! Why? Notice the shop beside the store.

Yep, looks like Floyd left the Andy in Mayberry and opened his barber shop in Virginia!

The gentleman sitting in front of the charming country store chatted with my husband and promised to come inside later to play some music.

Music in the Floyd Country Store

There were other wonderful shops as well.

Notice the caption on this sign – one doesn’t see the invitation to loiter very often!

“Loitering Allowed!”

We spent a lot of time in the consignment shop too. I will save my purchases for another post. I will say that I found something from the 1920’s. This is important because, The Vision of a Mother’s Heart and the sequel I hope to finish by the beginning of the new year take place in a small community in rural Virginia during the “Roaring Twenties!”

One of the things I was looking for on this trip was to see houses that may have been built pre-1920’s and may have had a wrap-around porch. I will give you a hint about the sequel. Isabel stayed with a wonderful lady near Floyd County for a while. She was a very kind woman who lived in a house with a wrap-around porch.

I couldn’t resist getting a pic of this outfit. Reminds me of the Roaring Twenties!

Within view of the town is a beautiful sight. A white Church with it’s spire reaching up to  the sky. Couldn’t help but wonder if there was a Church bell, calling citizens to Church every Sunday morning.

As we were driving out of town, I saw a blue house that will be perfect for a scene in Hope Beyond The Sunset. You will recognize it when you read the story.

For my fellow history buffs reading this blog, Floyd, VA was once named Jacksonville to honor Andrew Jackson, the seventh President of the United States (1829–1837).

Floyd, Va is also recognized as one area ministered to by Bob Childress of The Man Who Moved A Mountain. (By Richard C. Davis and is available on Amazon.com.)

That’s all for tonight, friends. Hope you enjoyed our little journey into the Blue Ridge Mountains of southwestern Virginia. I know we did!

For more information about the area, click on the following link. http://www.floydvirginia.com/visitors-guide/

Searching for a nice place to visit in Virginia? Try Roaring Run Iron Furnace – More Virginia History!

Roaring Run Iron Furnace in Virginia. Pre-civil war.

I was looking through some photos the other day and found some pictures John and I took a couple of years ago of the Roaring Run Iron Furnace in Virginia. This iron furnace was built in 1834 and abandoned in 1854.

So peaceful, so serene and will soon be emblazoned

with beautiful gold, orange and red colors of autumn.

For more information, check out the following links! Great site for a home school trip!

Great information for a history report too. So pack your picnic basket and hop in the car this weekend to enjoy part of our history in a beautiful setting.

http://botetourtironfurnaces.com/roaring.htm

http://www.fs.usda.gov/gwj/

http://206.113.151.20/wildernessroad/wrTimeline.asp

http://ironfurnaces.com/wiki/index.php?title=Roaring_Run_Furnace_%28VA%29