Tag Archive | Hope Beyond The Sunset

How to drive a Ford Model T – YouTube

How to drive a Ford Model T – YouTube.

 

In The Vision of a Mother’s Heart, “Papa” drove a Model T Ford. In my research for a chapter in the sequel where Papa teaches thirteen-year-old Isabel how to drive, I ran across this video in my research.
I had asked my father, Charles McReynolds about the car and he had two important but surprising points to include.

1. The Model T had three pedals on the floor. The middle pedal is “Reverse” and the right pedal is the brake – No gas pedal!

2. When cranking the car to start it, it was important to hold the thumb close to the hand – “don’t use the thumb. If the crank backfires it can break your thumb off or at least will break the thumb.” Ouch!

In my research I also found that if the weather is cold, one must use one’s left hand to turn the crank. If the right hand is used, it could break the right arm. Scary, wasn’t it?

My grandmother, Isabel wanted to learn to drive at the age of thirteen because that is the age her two older brothers learned to drive. I can see why Papa was hesitant. Did he teach her to drive?

We’ll learn the answer in the sequel, Hope Beyond The Sunset!

Until next time,

Kathy

Joshua 1:9 (KJV)

Handkerchiefs

In the Vision of a Mother’s Heart, handkerchiefs are often mentioned. Isabel saved one that her “Mama” had embroidered for her and is again mentioned in the sequel I am currently working on, Hope Beyond The Sunset.

Notice the folded handkerchief in this photograph. It belonged to my grandmother, Isabel.

Apparently, even as a child I loved “old fashioned” things. I had a clear idea of gifts perfect for my grandmother. Talcum powder with the big, fluffy powder puff, a broach with pansies painted on it (even though I never remember her actually wearing broaches or pins) and always thought the greatest gift was a pretty hankie. I don’t know how old I was when I gave this hankie to Granny but she returned it on my wedding day to carry on that day and to keep. She also gave me the pansy broach (I will write about this later) and a double string of pearls which I passed down to my sister when she got married.

I love this hankie and think of her every time I open my music/trinket box. Now that I am older, I realize she could have been offended by my stereotype gifts but she always graciously received each gift as if it was “just what she wanted!”

I have several vintage hankies passed down from family members and some “new vintage” hankies that I have ordered through the years. I have thought about making a quilt, pillows or “something” to display them while creating a legacy to pass down to other family members some day.

I ran across this website and thought others who have an affection for hankies too will enjoy this site too. Perhaps you will see one that reminds you of your grandmother!

Do you have a story or craft relating to vintage handkerchiefs? I would love to read about it!

http://www.nanaluluslinensandhandkerchiefs.com/