Roanoke Today Through the Lens of Award Winning Photographer Terry Aldhizer!

Little Isabel and Rainy Days ~ Conclusion

Photo used with permission.

Photo used with permission.

It seemed as if they had been in the cellar forever but if Isabel had been able to tell time, she would realize it had only been an hour. She sat on a wooden bench with her head in Mama’s lap and dozed as male voices droned on about the old days.

Suddenly, the sound of breaking glass and a loud thump made Mama jump; almost dumping Isabel on the dirt floor. “I’m sorry, Isabel,” Mama said with a soft, quivering voice. The quiver in Mama’s voice frightened the child more than the loud noises above them.

“Don’t worry. Probably just a broken window.” Papa stroked his chin and walked to the ladder leading to the trap door.

“We should wait a few minutes until we are sure the storm has died down,” Mr. Scott stepped ahead of Papa, climbed three rungs of the latter and put his ear to the trap door.

Isabel smiled at the sight of the man whose hair matched the wall. He also had red dirt smeared on his face, hands and shirt. She looked at her own dirty hands and then up at Mama who smiled.


Eugene followed Papa and looked up at the door. “I wonder if this is how Noah and his family felt?”

“What do you mean?”

“Well, it was raining hard outside for a long time and they were stuck inside the ark wondering.”

“Why didn’t they open the door and look out?” Curtis asked seriously.

“They couldn’t do that, silly. Remember? God shut the door!”

“What if lions, tigers and rats tried to eat them?” Curtis said with a smile.

“Did that happen, Mama?” Isabel’s enormous eyes turned to Mama.

“No dear.” Mama said softly. God protected them. The ark was a place of safety. God took care of them and of the animals that lived in a separate part of the ark. Noah and his family took care of the animals God sent to them.”

“Oh, that’s good.” Isabel looked at Mama cat curled on the floor at Mama’s feet with kittens cuddled closely. She reached to pet the velvety coats but Mama took Isabel’s hand into her own and then lifted her onto her lap.

“The kittens are like babies. They need lots of sleep.” As if on cue, Mama Cat opened her eyes and began grooming her little ones.


“Looks like we can go back upstairs now,” Mr. Scott said as he opened the trap door. “Doesn’t look too bad from here,” he said as he turned back toward the family. “Something smells awfully good too!”

“Oh, the stew,” Mama exclaimed as she lifted Isabel to the floor and rushed to the ladder. “I hope it didn’t burn. I remember sliding the pot to the back of the stove.”

“Ummm. Smells just right to me,” Papa said with a grin.

Mr. Scott stepped into the kitchen and reached for each of the children, cat, kittens, cradle, Mama and baby before Papa stepped into the kitchen, closing the trap door securely.

c45b46f862df9b41e062843447890c6fkitchen decoupage Maria Laura

Everyone stood in the kitchen as if afraid to move. “Well, it aint too bad,” Papa said as he ran his hands through his salt and pepper hair. I’ll cover that kitchen window with a tarp for now.”

“Don’t worry about that,” Mama said as she nodded toward the window. Looks like the rain has stopped and the fresh air feels wonderful. Just as she finished speaking, a hiss and a whine came from the basket near the stove. Mama Cat looked with consternation at two brown puppies shivering by the bowl formerly filled with cream. To everyone’s amazement, Mama Cat placed her kittens into the basket and then herded the puppies into the basket, lay beside them and began grooming them as if they were kittens.

“I’ve never seen anything like that.” Papa exclaimed and Mama smiled.

“She isn’t seeing puppies,” Mama said softly. “She just sees puppies in need of a mama. Now, why don’t you men clean up the glass and leaves that have blown in while I prepare lunch? Isabel, would you like to help me?”

Isabel nodded vigorously while Mama pulled out a flour sacking cloth and tied it around Isabel as an apron.

“Look!” Curtis pointed to the kitchen window to a beautiful double rainbow. Everyone ran to the window and Papa lifted Isabel to his shoulder.

“Jesus did keep us safe just like he did for Noah!”

“I know today isn’t Thanksgiving but today, I am very thankful,” Mr. Scott said as he pulled a handkerchief from his pocket and loudly blew his nose.

“Well then,” Mama said as she sliced bread and slathered them with butter. “Let’s sit around the table and give thanks.”


Later that evening as Mama was tucking Little Isabel into bed, Isabel reached for the toy rabbit her friend Sally Anne had given her at their first real tea party.

“I’m sorry you didn’t get to have a tea party for your friend, dear.”

“That’s okay, Mama. This was more fun and Jesus gave us our own rainbow!”

Little Isabel and Rainy Days ~ Part 5 ~ A Shelter in the time of storm.

A Shelter in the Time of Storm

Katherine Purdy

Photo found on Pinterest

Photo found on Pinterest

“Mr. Scott, what are you doing out in this terrible weather?” Mama’s voice had a soothing effect on Isabel.

“I came to check on you folks. This is a bad storm. Trees are down everywhere. I have a white pine half way into my house and it isn’t even Christmas,” he added with a nervous chuckle.

“Hello Mr. Greene,” Mr. Scott said as he stomped mud from his boots.

“Oh, don’t worry about the mud,” Mama said, “There’s no way to avoid mud this time. There are leaks everywhere. Come into the kitchen. I’ll fix you two a cup of hot coffee.”

“That would be wonderful Ma’am. I’m afraid we need to get you all to the cellar immediately. The storm has gotten worse and I’m afraid that black cloud from the west could be a tornado. I’ve never seen one but I know they come in the shape of an upside down funnel.”

“Oh, mercy!” Papa said as he, Mama and Mr. Scott quickly walked to the kitchen. “I don’t see how we will be able to get into the cellar because a tree fell on the back porch roof and part of the tree is covering the door.”

“There’s another way,” Mr. Scott said and loudly slurped his coffee Mama had quickly poured into a mug for him. “My grandparents built this house before the war and had a second cellar no one knew about. I discovered it when I was a lad. Let’s see now, there should be a trap door under the table. Grandma always covered it with a rug but even without the rug it is hard to see.”

Curtis crawled out from under the table with Isabel close behind. Mama reached to take sleeping Maggie from Eugene. “Mister, can we help?”

“Yes you may,” Mr. Scott said and smiled at each one as he pulled three peppermint sticks from his pocket. “Now if I remember right, the door is part of the wood planks. There should be a little more space between the wood – the hinges to the door are underneath. He pulled an ivory jack knife from his pocket and got down on his knees, knocking on the floor, easing the knife between each plank. Papa pulled out his knife and followed suit as the brothers started knocking too.

“Papa,” Eugene said, “why are we knocking?”

“There will be a different sound when we hit the door.”

“Eureka!” Mr. Scott indicated a section of floor and both men loosened the boards with their knives. “We should be able to lift the door in one piece. Time may have caused the boards to swell but we’ll pry it open.”

Isabel’s eyes grew enormous at the sight. The rumble of thunder caused Isabel to jump and everyone laughed nervously.  “Come dear and help me pack some things we may need in the cellar. We have shelves filled with canned fruit, vegetables, apples and potatoes so we won’t starve.”

“I’m sorry Ma’am but we might not be able to get to your root cellar. I’ll tell you all about it when we are safe underground.

Dust and a musty smell filled the kitchen as the door opened with a loud squeak.

“I’ll test out the ladder,” Mr. Scott said as he tentatively placed his foot on the first step into the dark, mysterious hideaway. “So far, so good; if it holds my weight, we will be okay. Mrs. Greene, why don’t you come first with the little one. We will bring the cradle and a couple of those quilts the boys were using.”


Isabel watched with wide eyes as the large man with red hair helped Mama down the ladder. Eugene passed the quilts and a sack of bread to Mr. Scott before stepping into his new adventure followed by Curtis bearing a lantern. Papa picked up Isabel and kissed her on the forehead. “You’re next, Princess.”

Isabel held tight onto Papa’s neck when two large hands of a stranger reached for her.

“It’s alright, Isabel. Let Mr. Scott help you down,” Mama said firmly. “We must hurry. Papa needs to come down so that we can close the door against the storm.”  Isabel nodded slightly as she let go of Papa’s neck.

“That’s a good girl,” the man said in a soothing voice. “I know you’re afraid. We’re going somewhere safe so that no one will get hurt in this storm. It’s not like a regular storm. It’s a mean storm.”

“Like the time it rained on Noah’s Ark?”

“It won’t last that long,” he said with a chuckle, “We should be safe down here just like Noah and his family were safe from the storm. Now, that climb down wasn’t too bad was it? There’s your Mama over there by the lantern.”

Isabel turned and ran to Mama and watched as Papa stepped on the first rung of the ladder. “Well I’ll be!” Papa chuckled, picked up Mama cat and the white kitten and passed them to the astonished landlord. “Mama Cat and her kittens need shelter from the storm too.”


Mr. Scott passed the cats to Eugene who set Mama Cat on the ground.  “Better hold her, Son. She may try to go after the other kittens.” While he was speaking, Papa returned to the ladder with the basket of kittens, passed it to Mr. Scott, reached for two jugs of water and  then closed the door and attached the rope handle to a hook on the wall.

“Wind’s whipping around the house and whistling a tune,” Papa said as he stepped onto the dirt floor. “Mighty fine shelter you have here.”

Isabel followed Papa’s gaze around the room. One side of the shelter was lined with shelves and vegetable bins. Empty barrels with lids askew sat at the far end of the room. Next to the barrels was a large trunk. I wonder what’s in there? Isabel wanted to ask Mr. Scott but when he looked in her direction, she felt shy and hid her face in Mama’s apron.

Papa began praying aloud for each person in the room and for those who did not have a shelter in the time of storm.

Little Isabel leaned close to Mama as Papa prayed and sighed with contentment. We will be safe, just like Noah and his family. Mama Cat started purring as if she had read the child’s thoughts. Isabel opened one eye to peek at Mama who gently stroked her hair and whispered in Isabel’s ear. “We will be fine. Jesus is with us.”

Photo used with permission.

Photo used with permission.

Little Isabel and Rainy Days ~ Part 4 ~ Rain, Rain Go Away!

Rain, Rain Go Away!

Katherine H. Purdy


“Let’s read about Noah from God’s Word, the Bible.” Mama reached for the Bible on the shelf as Papa slipped into the other rooms, cutting canvas and draping it over pieces of furniture before returning to the kitchen with two full buckets of water, dumped them into water barrels on the back porch and made another trip. By the time he had finished, Eugene, Curtis and Isabel were sitting patiently on the floor and baby Maggie slept soundly in her tented cradle.

Mama opened the Bible to Genesis and began to read.

At that very moment, lightning flashed across the sky and thunder shook the house; accompanied by heavy rain.

“Hurry children,” Mama said as she sat the Bible on a chair and slid it under the table, “ crawl under the table where you will be protected.” With tears in her eyes, Isabel crawled under the table tent and lifted the corner to see if Mama would follow.

“Mama, I’m scared!”

“Yes dear, I know.” Mama stooped and looked under the table. “Eugene, I want you to hold the baby while I help Papa. Just hold her close. Curtis, sit close to Isabel, please. You are her big brother and protector. Don’t worry, everything will be alright.”


“Yes, Mama,” Eugene said as he reached for Baby Maggie and then turned to Isabel.

“Ah, it’s alright Sis. God is in control.”

“That’s right, Sis. Remember Noah’s Ark?”

Isabel nodded and peeked under the canvas flap to watch the rain on the window panes. Trees bending in the wind and suddenly, rain drops turned to hail. “Rain, rain, go away. Come again another day. All of us want to go out and play!”

“Eugene, how long did God let it rain on Noah’s Ark?”

“Forty days,” he answered softly. “It won’t rain that long here.”

“Is that a long time?”

“Yeah, Sis it is. But that won’t happen here; right Curtis?”

Isabel turned to her other brother who nodded solemnly.

“How come?”

“Because God promised He would never destroy the world with rain again, He even put a rainbow in the sky to remind us He keeps His promise.”

Curtis squirmed, scratched his head and looked up at his older brother. “Did He promise not to flood houses?”

“Aw, it will be over soon and we will tell everybody at school we had a kitchen table tent!”

“Will it help if we pray like Mama and Papa?”

“Maybe.” Eugene scratched his head and then quickly replaced his hand on the baby. “Even if it doesn’t stop raining right now, Mama says that when we are afraid, He comforts us and provides a way to not be afraid anymore.”

“Okay,” Isabel said

Isabel rested her head on the edge of Maggie’s blanket and was almost asleep when she heard footsteps on the front porch and then a loud banging on the door.

“Jesus is coming to help us,” she mumbled as she drifted off to sleep.

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Little Isabel and Rainy Days ~ Part 2 Enduring the Storm

Enduring the Storm

Katherine H. Purdy


Isabel awakened to the pitter-patter of rain on the roof and the delicious sound of bacon sizzling in the skillet on the stove.

“Hey sleepyhead, it’s time to get up!” Eugene sat on the edge of the bed. “Mama said to give you a piggy-back ride to the kitchen because there is water everywhere!”

“Oh boy, I love rrr-rain!” Isabel giggled as they trotted over and around bowls, pitchers, pots and pans collecting water on the floor.

“Mama said we will have to stay in the kitchen all day where it’s nice and warm.” Eugene said as he lowered Isabel down at the kitchen table.

“Good morning, Sunshine!” Mama said as she placed a platter of food on the table.

“Whoo-whee,” Papa said as he entered the back door, dumping water from his hat onto the steps and stood on the rug to wipe his feet. “It’s a great day for ducks and geese,” he said as Mama helped him struggle out of his large, wet coat. “On second thought, it may be too much rain for them too.”

“You’re soaked to the skin,” Mama observed as she handed Papa his slippers. “Maybe you should change and we’ll dry out your clothes by the stove.”

“Oh, I’ll be okay in here by the stove. Besides, I have to go right back outside after breakfast.

“This is a big storm, We have a few tree limbs scattered everywhere and a few saplings have been uprooted. Hope it passes by soon or blows itself out.” Papa shook water out of his hair as he passed Little Isabel’s chair; evoking giggles and wiggles as she tried to dodge the water droplets.

“Mama, can we eat now?” Curtis asked as he popped a piece of bacon into his mouth.

May we eat?” Mama said with a smile.

“That’s what I asked!”

“Not until we are all seated at the table. It’s impolite to eat before everyone is seated and the blessing said,” Mama answered as she poured hot coffee into two cups. Suddenly, lightning flashed across the sky followed by a sickening sound of cracking wood with a loud crash on the roof. “Oh no, the roof!” Mama screamed, turning her focus from the coffee to the window where branch from a falling tree brushed against the window.

Eugene and Curtis jumped from their chairs, turning them over in the process, Baby Maggie started crying and Isabel slid out of her chair and latched onto Mama’s skirt.

“ Hot Coff-coff-Coffee!” Papa shouted as the cup overflowed, splashing on him as he pushed away from the table, his chair slipped, dumping him onto the floor.

“Oh dear!” Mama rushed to help Papa with the coffee pot still in her hands and Eugene rushed to take it from her.

Papa shook his head and headed first to the window and then to the back door. He returned with a small branch in his hands. “I can’t believe it. The tree landed on the back porch roof and not the house; crashed right through.” Papa slowly shook head and took his place at the table and lead the family in prayer.

As Papa prayed, Isabel heard a soft cry. She opened one eye and looked around and caught Mama looking her and so she squeezed her eyes tight until Papa said, “Lord, thank you for keeping us safe and for sparing the roof to this house. In Jesus name we pray. Amen.”

“Not until we are all seated at the table. It’s impolite to eat before everyone is seated and the blessing said,” Mama answered as she poured hot coffee into two cups. Suddenly, lightning flashed across the sky followed by a sickening sound of cracking wood with a loud crash on the roof. “Oh no, the roof!” Mama screamed, turning her focus from the coffee to the window where branch from a falling tree brushed against the window.


Blessing said, tears dried, coffee cleaned up and refilled; the Greene family finally got down to business of eating when two squeaky sounds made their way to the kitchen table.

“What’s that?”

“It’s probably just limbs scraping against the house,” Papa said as he poured coffee from his cup into his saucer and sipped the hot, strong liquid.

“Maybe it’s a mouse,” Curtis said as he reached for another piece of bacon,

“Or a big fat rat with beady eyes and a long skinny tail,” Eugene said while making a scary face at Isabel.”

“A mouse? A rat? Isabel screeched as she stood on the kitchen chair. “Papa, it’s not a rat is it?”

“Oh, I don’t think so. At least not yet. There’s an opening now for mice to get in through that big hole in the porch roof.”

“Oh Avil,” Mama said as she wiped Maggie’s face with a wash cloth. “Don’t frighten the child. The storm is frightening enough.

Almost as if on cue, a loud meow echoed in the room. Isabel slid out of her chair and raced her brothers to the back porch. “Kittens!” Curtis said as he watched three kittens huddled between the tree branches lying on the porch.

“Four kittens and one Mama,” Eugene said as a gray tabby carried a kitten in her mouth and deposited it with the other three, shook water off her head and began to groom the tiny kittens.

“Well, will you look at that? Mama cat knows to bring her babies in from the rain,” Papa chuckled.

“Of course she does,” Mama said gently, “she’s a mother. Oh the poor dears are soaking wet and Mama cat must be so cold and wet. She had to bring each kitten in from the cold wind and rain. Eugene, please bring me the empty crate from the pantry. Curtis, please bring a towel and also bring some large flannel rags.”

Mama made a soft bed for Mama cat and her kittens and placed the bed by the warm stove. “We mustn’t disturb the kittens. I don’t anyone to pick them up. Not yet. Mama cat will give them everything they need and we will feed Mama cat a nice bowl of cream.”

Isabel put her hands behind her back to keep from picking up the tiny, crying kittens.

“Mama, did Jesus send us kittens because of the storm?”

Miss Madison10441101_10203141061280662_7210698404753137386_n

Egg Shampoo and Rainwater: Sample Chapter from The Vision of a Mother’s Heart (Katherine H. Purdy)

The weeks of rain showers reminde me of one of my favorite chapters in

The Vision of a Mother’s Heart!


 In 1924 some things were done differently. Isabel’s family had a pump in the kitchen but it only pumped cold water. Families who lived in the country only took a full bath once a week as well as washing their hair. In order to conserve water during a dry season, families kept a rain barrel under the gutter to catch rain water. If you were creative, you could turn a chore such as washing your hair into a play time. My grandmother talked about washing her hair in the rain and allowed her children to do the same. When I was a child, I wanted the same experience but was told there was too much pollution in the air.  So, lets enjoy Isabel and her two sisters experiencee from Chapter 22 of The Vision of a Mother’s Heart.

Egg Shampoo and Rainwater

“WELL,” MAMA said as she placed the last loaf of bread into the oven, “tomorrow is Sunday, so we need to wash your hair, girls.”

“May we wash our hair in the rain?” Isabel asked as she looked outside at the cool, steady rain from the kitchen window.

“You always say that rain water smells good and we won’t have to use up the well water for our hair.” Isabel smiled as she made the last comment, knowing Papa was worried that the well would go dry before the end of the summer.

“Well,” Mama said, “I suppose it would be alright as long as you agree to come back inside at the first sound of thunder.

Go upstairs, and put on your bathing clothes so you will not mess up your work clothes.”

“Yes, Mama,” Isabel said. She headed for the back steps to her room. Maggie and Sylvia followed and then passed her on the steps.

“Oh boy,” Sylvia raced to their room. “I love playing in the rain.”  ”Sylvia said as she quickly dressed.

“Well,” Isabel said, “we are not playing in the rain; we are washing our hair.”

Isabel said. She pulled out her bathing I wish Mama and Papa would allow us to wear the new style like everyone else.

These old things are heavier than our regular dresses. Besides, they look ugly, and they are no good for swimming.  The last time we went swimming, I nearly drowned because my clothes were full of water and dragging me under water.”

“I remember,” Maggie said. She giggled and watched Isabel make funny faces at the offending fabric.

“Ye gads,” Isabel said. She attempted to button the dress portion of her swimsuit.

“Isabel,” Maggie said, “you just used God’s name in vain.”

“No I didn’t. I just said the same thing everybody says.”

“Mama wouldn’t like it..”

“Oh, Maggie,” Isabel said to her sister, who was also struggling with her suit, “you are such a goody-goody sometimes.

Besides, I said g-a-ds and with a little g – like the Roman gods, you know.”

“That does not make it right, Isabel. It is still using God’s name in vain,” Maggie said.

 Isabel decided to drop the issue.

“I’m telling Mama you’re swearing,” Sylvia said as she headed for the bedroom door.

“Please don’t tell her.  It will only upset her, and I promise never to say that again.” Sylvia twisted the doorknob, and Isabel spoke up once more.

I will give you a nickel if you don’t tell.”

“Okay,” Sylvia said. She took the coin from Isabel and Now shut your eyes, and don’t peek!”

Even with her eyes closed, Isabel could hear Sylvia placing the coin under her mattress for safekeeping. Next, Isabel could hear a soft thud as Sylvia removed her hand from under the mattress and a trashing sound as her hands were smoothing out wrinkles from the covers.

As if we didn’t know where she keeps things she doesn’t want us to see,” Maggie said as Sylvia exited the room.

“What do you mean?” Isabel questioned with suspicion.

Sylvie always puts her money and other secret treasures under her mattress. Didn’t you know? ”

“No,” Isabel said.

Maggie said with a smile. “You keep your diary in that old hatbox in the far right corner of the closet,

and the key to unlock it is on a string hanging behind the picture on the wall.”

“Maggie Greene,” Isabel said, “you’ve been snooping.”

Maggie said sweetly as she walked to the window and pulled back the curtain, revealing the old climbing tree a few feet from the house.

“If you want to hide something in our room, you should close the curtain or make sure no one is sitting in the tree reading. ”

“Margaret Louise Greene,  it’s impolite to spy on people; you should have let me know ”

“I saw your diary and you wrote that you have a boyfriend.”

“I do not have a boyfriend!”

Isabel and Arnie sitting in a tree…” Maggie chanted as she took off down the steps with Isabel close behind.

“No running in the house, girls,” Mama said as they entered the kitchen. They slowed their pace to a quick walk as they stepped outside

into the pouring rain.

“Now girls,” Mama said as she stepped onto the back porch. “Lather your hair twice, and be sure to get the suds out.

I will mix up the rinse and be back in a few minutes.”

The three girls twirled around in the rain until their hair was completely wet and then stepped back onto the porch.

“Here,” Isabel said. She picked up the jar of shampoo. “I’ll pour some on your hair, and then you can pour some on mine.”

She poured the amber liquid onto Maggie’s head and massaged it into her sister’s hair. Next, Isabel turned and repeated the

 same for Sylvia. Then Maggie poured the slimy liquid onto Isabel’s head.

“Work up a good lather,” Isabel said as she worked the shampoo through her own long hair.

“Sylvie, it looks you’re wearing a crown on your head. Maggie, let’s see how high we can pile the suds on your head.”

The girls giggled as they made funny figurines on their heads.

“We should rinse it off or the suds will make our head itch.: Isabel quoted Mama, who warned them each time they washed their hair.

“We know that,” Maggie said and then raced off the porch to rinse the suds from her hair and was followed by her sisters.


The girls danced around in the rain again as they attempted to rinse out the offensive lather.

“Oh no,” Isabel said, “the rain is slacking off.”

“Let’s do the second lather before it stops altogether,” Maggie said.


They ran back to the porch and repeated the procedure. Just as they stepped off the porch, the sky seemed to open up

with the heaviest rain they had seen all year.

Sylvia said. She twirled around, allowing the rain to wash her face as well as whisk away the shampoo.

“My hair feels softer already and smells good too,” Isabel said.


Mama stepped onto the porch with a tray containing three jars. She handed Isabel the jar with an amber-colored liquid.

“Apple cider vinegar to rinse your pretty brown hair.”

Isabel wrinkled her nose as she drenched her hair with the pungent rinse. “It stinks,” she said.

“It will make your hair nice and shiny, and it will wash away the suds,” Mama said.

She handed the jar of lemon juice to Maggie and then poured the liquid from the remaining jar on Sylvia’s head and worked it through her hair.

“Why do we have to use lemon juice?” Sylvia asked.

“Because you have blonde hair; it will make it shine like the sun. Now, run back into the rain and rinse.”

The girls obeyed their mother and stepped back onto the porch to squeeze all of the water out of their hair.

Isabel ran her fingers through her hair as she pushed the water out and then squeezed.

“Do you hear that?” she said. “Squeaky clean.”

“Perfect!” Mama said and handed each daughter a dry towel. “Now squeeze the water out of your suits, and go inside.”


After changing from their wet clothes, Isabel and her sisters returned to the kitchen to sit by the stove to dry their hair as they

enjoyed freshly baked cookies and hot chocolate.

“I love washing my hair in the rain,” Isabel said.

“Me too,” the younger girls agreed.

“Yes,” Mama said, “I’m thankful for the rain which will help the crops grow and will help keep my family clean.”


The argument between Isabel and Maggie was lost in the suds and washed away with the raindrops.


Character In Action: Taking the Next Steps by Marilyn Boyer & Kelley Boyer.

“Therefore shall ye lay up these my words in your heart in in your soul, and bind them for a sign upon your hand, that they may be as frontlets between your eyes and ye shall teach your children, speaking of them when thou sittest in thou house, and when thou walkest by the way, when thou liest down, and when thou riseth up.”   Deuteronomy 11:18-19 (KJV)


A Book Review

I recently wrote a review for my friends, Marilyn Boyer and her daughter, Kelley Boyer. If anyone is qualified to write about character, it is Marilyn Boyer.

Marilyn and her husband, Rick (also known as “Uncle Rick” for his great storytelling).

We have known the Boyers almost thirty years and have watched their 14 children grow both physically and spiritually to become men and women of character.  I still have notes from Kelley and Kasey Boyer in my “treasure” box.

Character In Action is about “the cousins“. The next generation of Boyer children learning to put God’s Word into action in their lives.



Character in Action

Taking the Next Steps by Marilyn Boyer & Kelley Boyer is an awesome tool for parents and teachers.

My Review: 5 Stars!
I love this book! I have seen Boyer children grow up and start families of their own. They are men and women of integrity and are teaching their children to put character traits in action. Each chapter begins with the Character Trait with a corresponding Bible Verse and stories of “the cousins” putting what they have learned into action. In this book, each chapter ends with a list of suggestions. “Try to put yourself in the place of others. Think how would I feel if I were in their place. What could I do that would really be a help to them? Ask God to show you needs that you can meet.” Compassion in Action) This sums it up in a nutshell. How many children are taught to put themselves in someones place? In a self-absorbed world, this book is refreshing and elightning. I highly recommend this book for parents, grandparents, teachers and anyone who works with children. I see there are things I can also do for others!

Check out their website, Character Concepts. Just click below and find a wealth of wisdom and tools to help you teach your children and grandchildren Character Concepts.

Character Concepts

How Great Thou Art A Cappella Hymns (CD)

How Great Thou Art

I heard this on A Capella version of How Great Thou Art and just had to share it with you!

Discovery House is your trusted source for Christian Books, Music, DVDs, gifts, and more for your spiritual growth. For over 25 years Discovery House has been a part of the RBC Ministries, the people who bring you Our Daily Bread.

Source: How Great Thou Art A Cappella Hymns (CD)

God Bless America with Kate Smith

May God bless America. Thank you all who have served and have loved ones who gave their life that our Flag may still wave.

56493e43758a58380d3ed360d1e30ac8In God We Trust (2014_05_25 22_33_57 UTC)


God Bless America written by Irving Berlin sang by Kate Smith